St Sidwell’s Centre Fundraising Appeal

Creating a green oasis, building community and commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Baedaker Blitz

Please support our 2017 Fundraising campaign.

St Sidwell’s is a community hub, an independent charity that brings together people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds. At St Sidwell’s everyone works together.

We are currently raising money for two projects:

Firstly, we want to raise £20,000 – by May 4th – to continue the transformation of our grounds into an attractive and multi-functional green space for the benefit of all Exeter residents. Volunteers (everyone is welcome to join us) will work alongside professionals to design and install a pergola, new lighting, heritage information displays, a water feature and a willow sculpture of Sidwella. With the help of two grants we are already half-way to our target but we need your help to raise the remaining £10,000. You can make a donation here, by dropping a cheque in the post or by popping in.

Our second project involves the restoration of stained glass windows and statues that were retrieved from the bombsite in 1942. The unique and beautiful stained glass windows were rescued, put into storage and forgotten about for over 60 years. The statues (of St Sidwella and St Boniface) were by world renowned Victorian sculptor Harry Hems and, until recently, lay forgotten in our grounds. We want to bring them back, fully restored, to their original home in Sidwell Street where they can be enjoyed by everybody. We aim to raise £5000 of the £8000 needed through a Crowdfunding appeal that will be launched in April.

Why have we chosen May 4th to end our campaign? Because May 4th 2017 will mark the 75th anniversary of the night of terror Exeter suffered in 1942 when it became the first target of the ‘Baedeker Blitz’. The bombing had a monumental effect on Exeter and would change the face of the city forever, with many lives lost and scores of ancient and historic buildings destroyed in a single night. St Sidwell’s Church, built in 1812, took a direct hit.

Both projects aim to revive the rich history of Sidwell Street that was lost in 1942 as well as sustaining our ongoing community work and helping us build for the future.

Thanks for your support